How long do COVID antibodies last: Days, months, years or gone too soon?



How long do COVID antibodies last: Days, months, years or gone too soon?

They were present “regardless of the severity of the illness, the age of the patients or the presence of other pathologies,” according to a statement from the San Raffaele hospital in Milan, as reported by NDTV.

Antibodies against coronavirus remained in the blood of patients with Covid-19 for at least eight months after they were infected, Italian researchers said Tuesday. They were present “regardless of the severity of the illness, the age of the patients or the presence of other pathologies,” according to a statement from the San Raffaele hospital in Milan.

Coronavirus is an infection that has caused a global pandemic. The world is banking big on a global vaccination programme that will see a maximum number of people gaining immunity so that humanity can beat this contagion and move forward.

Like our own memory, our immune system remembers some infections very well but tends to forget some others. For example, the vaccine given for measles, the MMR vaccine, provides life-long immunity against the disease. However, some flu vaccines require an annual dose, as the antibodies last only for a limited period in the immune system.

Italian study on how long do antibodies last:

The researchers, working with Italy’s ISS national health institute, studied 162 patients with symptomatic coronavirus who turned up at the emergency room during the country’s first wave of infections last year. 29 patients died. Blood samples were taken from the recovered patients in March and April and again at the end of November.

“The presence of neutralising antibodies, while reducing over the time, was very persistent — eight months after diagnosis, there were only three patients who no longer showed positivity to the test,” said the statement, issued jointly with the ISS.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can be fatal in a significant proportion of hospitalized Corona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) patients despite the development of an antiviral antibody response. Studies in large cohorts of SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals indicate that antibodies to the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the viral spike glycoprotein appear within the first three weeks from symptoms onset and that IgG and/or IgA seroconversion occurs either sequentially or simultaneously with the appearance of IgM, says the research.

The study, published in the Nature Communications scientific journal, also emphasised the importance of the development of antibodies in recovering from coronavirus.

“Those who failed to produce them within the first 15 days of infection are at greater risk of developing severe forms of Covid-19,” it said.

Different rates of waning:

In another study, it was found that antibodies against the novel coronavirus wane at different rates, lasting for mere days in some individuals, while persisting in others for decades, according to a new study which says Covid-19 severity could be a deciding factor in having longer-lasting protection against reinfection. The research, published in The Lancet Microbe journal, noted that recovered patients with low levels of neutralising antibodies may still be protected from reinfection if they have robust immunity in the form of the body’s T-Cells.

Since antibodies wane faster in some individuals, the scientists believe re-infection may occur in subsequent waves of infection, says a report in the Deccan Herald. They said if immunity provided via vaccinations also wanes like naturally-produced antibodies, annual vaccine administration could be necessary to prevent future outbreaks of Covid-19.

“The key message from this study is that the longevity of functional neutralising antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 can vary greatly and it is important to monitor this at an individual level,” said Professor Wang Linfa, from Duke-NUS’ Emerging Infectious Diseases (EID) Programme, a corresponding author of the study.

Source:-timesnownews

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